Embedded in Academia : C and C++ Aren’t Future Proof

January 21, 2013 Leave a comment

This propensity for today’s working programs to be broken tomorrow is what I mean when I say these languages are not future proof. In principle a big C/C++ program that has been extensively tested would be future-proof if we never upgraded the compiler, but this is often not a viable option.

via Embedded in Academia : C and C++ Aren’t Future Proof.

Conway’s Game of Life for Curved Surfaces (Part 1) « 0 FPS

November 21, 2012 Leave a comment

Why is git POSIX dependant?

November 8, 2012 Leave a comment
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Perspectives on LedgerSMB: O/R modelling interlude: PostgreSQL vs MySQL

September 9, 2012 Leave a comment

Every time we see people look at PostgreSQL and MySQL on the internet it falls into a flame war fast.  I think that a large part of the problem is that advocates of these databases look at the other database (and advocacy of the other database) through a specific lens and therefore are unable to understand the rhetoric from the other side.  This is an attempt to cut through some of this and offered in the spirit of suggesting that if we can’t understand eachother’s views, then instead of discussion all we will get are flames.

via Perspectives on LedgerSMB: O/R modelling interlude: PostgreSQL vs MySQL.

Kanjoya | Uncovering the Big Five Human Mindsets with graph theory

September 6, 2012 Leave a comment

Emotions are complicated, unpredictable and deeply personal. We feel them; we usually don’t think we can quantify them. Some people even claim that emotions are completely outside the sphere of what can be understood. After all, emotions are not perceived with the mind but instead felt with the heart, right?

via Kanjoya | Uncovering the Big Five Human Mindsets with graph theory.

IBM Research Announces New Advances in Quantum Computing

August 31, 2012 Leave a comment

Harvard cracks DNA storage, crams 700 terabytes of data into a single gram | ExtremeTech

August 19, 2012 Leave a comment

A bioengineer and geneticist at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have successfully stored 5.5 petabits of data — around 700 terabytes — in a single gram of DNA, smashing the previous DNA data density record by a thousand times.

via Harvard cracks DNA storage, crams 700 terabytes of data into a single gram | ExtremeTech.